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The lobbyist behind this proposal needs to explain what is wrong with our four existing wireless broadband networks that cover a far larger area than Melbourne. With todays costs of $15 per month for 1GB access, wireless broadband is affordable to anyone who could afford a laptop computer. By the time any WiFi? ? network is built, WiFi? ? will appear to be a slow option and could never have the coverage that ANY of these four wireless broadband networks do today.

All four of these services cover all of greater Melbourne and all but one will have extensive regional Victorian coverage by November 2008. These services also work at home for non-residents, and work on public transport while commuting.

Download allowances have been doubling every 6 months on HSDPA* at the same price. HSPA+* will be deployed within six to twelve months and offer even faster speed than home connections and higher download allowances. One carrier is planning their LTE deployment. Melbourne is quite possibly the world leader in wireless with world first LTE* trials being carried out right here! The world's showcase mobile broadband network was designed by a team in Melbourne (It is the world's largest, world's fastest and built in record time).

I cannot see how wasting the city's precious financial resources to duplicate an inexpensive high quality service where there is already four outstanding world-class competing options can be money well spent except in the eyes of the contracted network builder and operator.

*HSDPA, HSPA+ and LTE are high speed mobile broadband standards.

-- Users. DavidDoukidis - 10 Jun 2008 - 13:00

Hi David, I've just moved your comments to the discussion page for this topic so that others can can respond to your points.

I tend to agree that WIFI technologies will soon be outdated by other more superior technologies already coming through. It's true also that not one metropolitan WIFI initiative has succeeded anywhere in the world to date. Sydney was the last major city to cancel its WIFI project on the basis which you have outlined above:

http://www.smh.com.au/news/technology/free-sydney-wifi-plan-bites-the-dust/2008/05/01/1209235036576.html

I think careful consideration is required regarding whether or not the proposal for metropolitan WIFI is appropriate.

-- DaleBowerman - 10 Jun 2008 17:38

David and Dale - The intent of this goal certainly isn't to promote an outdated solution. I searched a bit, but couldn,t find a good statement about SDPA, HSPA+ and LTE as it might play out in Melbourne in the near future and that also the general public would comprehend. Rather than getting hung up on particular technical options this goal ideally needs good generic statements. With this in mind I have replace "WiFi" with " Personal Broadband Wireless systems". Any suggestions?

-- DavidMayes - 06 Jul 2008 12:33

Wikicity model

Regarding the addition of "The development of a 'WikiCity' model for Melbourne" under Goal 3, here are several resources. They are wikis that are either run independently of, or in association with local government and facilitate the documentation of local culture and history. Here are pages listing other WikiCities around the world:

Also, regardless of current challenges of developing a profitable/viable model for free municipal wireless / data access, I believe there is still (and will always) be merit in considering the Internet (or information access in general) as a public service/right - like the provision of clean drinking water or public libraries. Information access is a core/defining attribute of a thriving democratic society1 and the provision of such access equitably across economic, social, age, geographical and practicality gaps is key to thriving in the burgeoning knowledge economy.

-- MarkElliott - 17 Jun 2008 16:10

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References

1 : Benkler, Y. (2006). The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom. London: Yale University Press.


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Topic revision: r19 - 28 Oct 2008 - 18:09:49 - DaleBowerman
FMPlan.S2G4P4CultivateAUniversalAndDynamicOnlineCultureDiscussion moved from FMPlan.S2G4P4CultivateAUniversalAndAynamicOnlineCultureDiscussion on 19 Jun 2008 - 01:55 by DaleBowerman - put it back